Biochemistry

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    Protocols in Current Issue
    Intracellular cAMP Measurements in Candida albicans Biofilms
    Authors:  Liuliu Jiang, Shengyan Chen, Kairui Sun, Peng Zhou and Xin Wei, date: 12/05/2019, view: 29, Q&A: 0
    [Abstract] Candida albicans is the most common cause of fungal infections worldwide. Infection by C. albicans is closely associated with its ability to form a biofilm, closely packed communities of cells attached to the surfaces of human tissues and implanted devices, in or on the host. When tested for susceptibility to antifungals, such as ...
    Separation of Free and Bound cAMP in Mycobacteria
    Authors:  Arka Banerjee and Sandhya S. Visweswariah, date: 07/20/2016, view: 4808, Q&A: 0
    [Abstract] Mycobacterial genomes encode a plethora of genes that are involved in the synthesis, utilization and degradation of cAMP. The genome of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, for example, encodes 16 adenylyl cyclases and 10 genes harbouring the cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domain (Shenoy and Visweswariah, 2006). Cyclic AMP is efficiently secreted by ...
    Measurement of Intracellular cAMP Levels Using the Cyclic Nucleotide XP Enzymatic Immunoassay Kit in Bacteria
    Authors:  Sarah K Giles, Uwe H Stroeher and Melissa H Brown, date: 04/20/2016, view: 7372, Q&A: 0
    [Abstract] Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous secondary signaling molecule, commonly associated with many bacterial processes, including the regulation of virulence factors, such as biofilms, pellicles and motility (Wolfgang, 2003). The quantity of available cAMP is controlled by the interplay between the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to cAMP by ...
    Cyclic Nucleotide (cAMP and cGMP) Assays and Capture ELISA for Quantitative Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum Blood-stage Egress
    Authors:  Fiona Hackett, Christine R Collins, Malcolm Strath and Michael J Blackman, date: 03/05/2014, view: 7085, Q&A: 0
    [Abstract] Upon rupture of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) schizonts in vitro (an event known as egress), merozoites are released into the culture medium. The merozoites invade fresh red blood cells, a process that involves shedding of a microneme protein called apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) from the merozoite surface. ...



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