Microbiology


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0 Q&A 1815 Views Feb 5, 2022

Biofilms serve as a bacterial survival strategy, allowing bacteria to persist under adverse environmental conditions. The non-pathogenic Listeria innocua is used as a surrogate organism for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, because they share genetic and physiological similarities and can be used in a Biosafety Level 1 laboratory. Several methods are used to evaluate biofilms, including different approaches to determine biofilm biomass or culturability, viability, metabolic activity, or other microbial community properties. Routinely used methods for biofilm assay include the classical culture-based plate counting method, biomass staining methods (e.g., crystal violet and safranin red), DNA staining methods (e.g., Syto 9), methods that use metabolic substrates to detect live bacteria (e.g., tetrazolium salts or resazurin), and PCR-based methods to quantify bacterial DNA. The NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase biofilm assay is a viable alternative or complement to existing methods. Functional Nluc was expressed in L. innocua using the nisin-inducible expression system and bacterial detection was performed using furimazine as substrate. Concentration dependent bioluminescence signals were obtained over a concentration range greater than three log units. The Nluc bioluminescence method allows absolute quantification of bacterial cells, has high sensitivity, broad range, good day-to-day repeatability, and good precision with acceptable accuracy. The advantages of Nluc bioluminescence also include direct detection, absolute cell quantification, and rapid execution.


Graphic abstract:



Engineering Listeria innocua to express NanoLuc and its application in bioluminescence assay.


0 Q&A 3489 Views Nov 20, 2019
Leishmaniasis remains a major public health problem worldwide with a prevalence of 12 million, an incidence of 1 million persons, and 350 million people being at risk. Murine models have been largely used for studying the host-pathogen relationship and developing effective chemotherapies against Leishmania parasites. Thus, preclinical imaging is crucial for monitoring the disease outcome. The aim of this protocol is to quantify parasite burden using bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Here, we describe a high-throughput imaging workflow, together with data acquisition and analysis ideal to assess in vivo parasite load in mouse models.



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