Reviewer
Raquel Santana da Cruz
  • Post-Doc, Georgetown University
Research focus
  • Cancer biology
  • Ancestral obesity and offspring pancreatic cancer risk
    Paternal diet programs breast cancer in female offspring

Education

PhD, University of Sao Paulo, 2016

Lab information

The research in our lab focuses on non-genetic inheritance of cancer predisposition. Each parent contributes half of their genome to their offspring, but at conception they also transmit a molecular memory of past environmental experiences to their progeny through epigenetic mechanisms. This epigenetic memory, stored in non-coding RNAs and other molecules, can determine the fate of organs in the developing embryo and make it more or less prone to developing chronic diseases such as cancer. Through our research, we seek to understand how paternal obesity, dietary patterns, stress and exposure to environmental toxicants before conception can modulate the risk for cancer in the next generation, including cancers of the breast and pancreas as well as neuroblastoma. We use animal models, in vitro systems, human cohorts, and molecular biology techniques to answer our questions.

Publications

da Cruz et al. Breast Cancer Research (2018) 20:99 https://doi.org/10.1186/s13058-018-1034-7
Fontelles CC, da Cruz RS, Hilakivi-Clarke L, de Assis S, Ong TP. Developmental Origins of Breast Cancer: A Paternal Perspective. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1735:91-103. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7614-0_5.
Fontelles CC, da Cruz RS, Hilakivi-Clarke L, de Assis S, Ong TP. Investigation
of Paternal Programming of Breast Cancer Risk in Female Offspring in Rodent Models. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1735:207-220. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7614-0_11.
R.S.M. de Miranda Torrinhas et al. / Clinical Nutrition 32 (2013) 503e510504
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