Cell Biology

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    Protocols in Current Issue
    Characterization of Amyloid Fibril Networks by Atomic Force Microscopy
    Authors:  Mirren Charnley , Jay Gilbert, Owen G. Jones and Nicholas P. Reynolds, date: 02/20/2018, view: 4749, Q&A: 0
    [Abstract] Dense networks of amyloid nanofibrils fabricated from common globular proteins adsorbed to solid supports can improve cell adhesion, spreading and differentiation compared to traditional flat, stiff 2D cell culture substrates like Tissue Culture Polystyrene (TCPS). This is due to the fibrous, nanotopographic nature of the amyloid fibril networks ...
    Preparation of Onion Epidermal Cell Walls for Imaging by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)
    Authors:  Tian Zhang and Daniel J. Cosgrove, date: 12/20/2017, view: 8325, Q&A: 0
    [Abstract] The growing plant cell wall is comprised of long, thin cellulose microfibrils embedded in a hydrated matrix of polysaccharides and glycoproteins. These components are typically constructed in layers (lamellae) on the inner surface of the cell wall, i.e., between the existing wall and the plasma membrane. The organization of these ...
    Nematode Epicuticle Visualisation by PeakForce Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy
    Authors:  Farida Akhatova, Gölnur Fakhrullina, Elvira Gayazova and Rawil Fakhrullin, date: 11/05/2017, view: 4779, Q&A: 0
    [Abstract] The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become an iconic experimental model animal in biology. This transparent animal can be easily imaged using optical microscopy to visualise its organs, tissues, single cells and subcellular events. The epicuticle of C. elegans nematodes has been studied at nanoscale using ...
    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Analysis of Cell Wall Structural Glycoproteins in vitro
    Authors:  Yuning Chen, Liwei Chen, Marcia J. Kieliszewsk and Maura C. Cannon, date: 07/20/2015, view: 6065, Q&A: 0
    [Abstract] Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) are major protein components in dicot primary cell walls and generally account for more than 10% of the wall dry weight. As essential members of the HRGP superfamily, extensins (EXTs) presumably function in the cell wall by assembling into positively charged protein scaffolds (Cannon et al., 2008) ...



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