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0 Q&A 310 Views Apr 5, 2024

Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of the hard and soft tissues comprising the periodontium. This destruction translates to a degradation of the extracellular matrices (ECM), mediated by bacterial proteases, host-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and other proteases released by host tissues and immune cells. Bacterial pathogens interact with host tissue, triggering adverse cellular functions, including a heightened immune response, tissue destruction, and tissue migration. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola is highly associated with periodontal disease. Dentilisin, a T. denticola outer membrane protein complex, contributes to the chronic activation of pro-MMP-2 in periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and triggers increased expression levels of activators and effectors of active MMP-2 in PDL cells. Despite these advances, no mechanism for dentilisin-induced MMP-2 activation or PDL cytopathic behaviors leading to disease is known. Here, we describe a method for purification of large amounts of the dentilisin protease complex from T. denticola and demonstrate its ability to activate MMP-2, a key regulator of periodontal tissue homeostasis. The T. denticola dentilisin and MMP-2 activation model presented here may provide new insights into the dentilisin protein and identify potential therapeutic targets for further research.

0 Q&A 287 Views Mar 20, 2024

Candida glabrata is an opportunistic pathogen that may cause serious infections in an immunocompromised host. C. glabrata cell wall proteases directly interact with host cells and affect yeast virulence and host immune responses. This protocol describes methods to purify β-1,3-glucan-bonded cell wall proteases from C. glabrata. These cell wall proteases are detached from the cell wall glucan network by lyticase treatment, which hydrolyzes β-1,3-glucan bonds specifically without rupturing cells. The cell wall supernatant is further fractioned by centrifugal devices with cut-offs of 10 and 50 kDa, ion-exchange filtration(charge), and gel filtration (size exclusion). The enzymatic activity of C. glabrata proteases is verified with MDPF-gelatin zymography and the degradation of gelatin is visualized by loss of gelatin fluorescence. With this procedure, the enzymatic activities of the fractions are kept intact, differing from methods used in previous studies with trypsin digestion of the yeast cell wall. The protein bands may be eventually located from a parallel silver-stained gel and identified with LC–MS/MS spectrometry. The advantage of this methodology is that it allows further host protein degradation assays; the protocol is also suitable for studying other Candida yeast species.


Key features

• Uses basic materials and laboratory equipment, enabling low-cost studies.

• Facilitates the selection and identification of proteases with certain molecular weights.

• Enables further functional studies with host proteins, such as structural or immune response–related, or enzymes and candidate protease inhibitors(e.g., from natural substances).

• This protocol has been optimized for C. glabrata but may be applied with modifications to other Candida species.


Graphical overview


0 Q&A 2323 Views Mar 20, 2024

Nanobodies are recombinant antigen-specific single domain antibodies (VHHs) derived from the heavy chain–only subset of camelid immunoglobulins. Their small molecular size, facile expression, high affinity, and stability have combined to make them unique targeting reagents with numerous applications in the biomedical sciences. From our work in producing nanobodies to over sixty different proteins, we present a standardised workflow for nanobody discovery from llama immunisation, library building, panning, and small-scale expression for prioritisation of binding clones. In addition, we introduce our suites of mammalian and bacterial vectors, which can be used to functionalise selected nanobodies for various applications such as in imaging and purification.


Key features

• Standardise the process of building nanobody libraries and finding nanobody binders so that it can be repeated in any lab with reasonable equipment.

• Introduce two suites of vectors to functionalise nanobodies for production in either bacterial or mammalian cells.


Graphical overview


0 Q&A 453 Views Feb 5, 2024

The human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can attach to epithelial cells or indwelling medical devices to form biofilms. These microbial communities are highly problematic in the clinic as they reduce both sensitivity to antifungal drugs and detection of fungi by the immune system. Amyloid structures are highly organized quaternary structures that play a critical role in biofilm establishment by allowing fungal cells to adhere to each other. Thus, fungal amyloids are exciting targets to develop new antifungal strategies. Thioflavin T is a specific fluorescent dye widely used to study amyloid properties of target proteins in vitro (spectrophotometry) and in vivo (epifluorescence/confocal microscopy). Notably, thioflavin T has been used to demonstrate the ability of Als5, a C. albicans adhesin, to form an amyloid fiber upon adhesion. We have developed a pipeline that allows us to study amyloid properties of target proteins using thioflavin T staining in vitro and in vivo, as well as in intact fungal biofilms. In brief, we used thioflavin T to sequentially stain (i) amyloid peptides, (ii) recombinant proteins, (iii) fungal cells treated or not with amyloid peptides, (iv) fungal amyloids enriched by cell fractionation, and (v) intact biofilms of C. albicans. Contrary to other methods, our pipeline gives a complete picture of the amyloid behavior of target proteins, from in vitro analysis to intact fungal biofilms. Using this pipeline will allow an assessment of the relevance of the in vitro results in cells and the impact of amyloids on the development and/or maintenance of fungal biofilm.


Key features

• Study of amyloid properties of fungal proteins.

• Visualization of the subcellular localization of fungal amyloid material using epifluorescence or confocal microscopy.

• Unraveling of the amyloid properties of target proteins and their physiological meaning for biofilm formation.

• Observation of the presence of amyloid structures with live-cell imaging on intact fungal biofilm using confocal microscopy.


Graphical overview


0 Q&A 450 Views Dec 5, 2023

Bio-hydrogen production is an eco-friendly alternative to commercial H2 production, taking advantage of natural systems. Microbial hydrogenases play a main role in biological mechanisms, catalyzing proton reduction to molecular hydrogen (H2) formation under ambient conditions. Direct determination is an important approach to screen bacteria with active hydrogenase and accurately quantify the amount of H2 production. Here, we present a detailed protocol for determining hydrogenase activity based on H2 production using methyl viologen (MV2+) as an artificial reductant, directly monitored by gas chromatography. Recombinant Escherichia coli is used as a hydrogenase-enriched model in this study. Even so, this protocol can be applied to determine hydrogenase activity in all biological samples.


Key features

• This protocol is optimized for a wide variety of biological samples; both purified hydrogenase (in vitro) and intracellular hydrogenase (in vivo) systems.

• Direct, quantitative, and accurate method to detect the amount of H2 by gas chromatography with reproducibility.

• Requires only 2 h to complete and allows testing various conditions simultaneously.

• Kinetic plot of H2 production allows to analyze kinetic parameters and estimate the efficiency of hydrogenase from different organisms.


Graphical overview


0 Q&A 431 Views Jul 20, 2023

An efficient cell culture system for hepatitis B virus (HBV) is indispensable for research on viral characteristics and antiviral agents. Currently, for HBV infection assays in cell culture, HBV genome-integrated cell line–derived viruses are commonly used. However, these viruses are not suitable for the evaluation of polymorphism-dependent viral characteristics or resistant mutations against anti-viral agents. To detect the infection of cell culture–generated HBV (HBVcc) by the transient transfection of the HBV molecular clone, a large amount of purified viruses is needed, because such viruses exhibit limited infection efficiencies in cell culture. Here, we describe how to generate and purify HBVcc by the transient transfection of HBV molecular clones. This system provides a powerful tool for studying the infection and propagation of HBV and for developing anti-viral agents against HBV.

0 Q&A 342 Views Jul 5, 2023

Toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are widespread bacterial immune systems that confer protection against various environmental stresses. TA systems have been classified into eight types (I–VIII) based on the nature and mechanism of action of the antitoxin. Type III TA systems consist of a noncoding RNA antitoxin and a protein toxin, forming a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) TA complex that plays crucial roles in phage defence in bacteria. Type III TA systems are present in the human gut microbiome and several pathogenic bacteria and, therefore, could be exploited for a novel antibacterial strategy. Due to the inherent toxicity of the toxin for E. coli, it is challenging to overexpress and purify free toxins from E. coli expression systems. Therefore, protein toxin is typically co-expressed and co-purified with antitoxin RNA as an RNP complex from E. coli for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we have optimized the co-expression and purification method for ToxIN type III TA complexes from E. coli that results in the purification of TA RNP complex and, often, free antitoxin RNA and free active toxin in quantities required for the biophysical and structural studies. This protocol can also be adapted to purify isotopically labelled (e.g., uniformly 15N- or 13C-labelled) free toxin proteins, free antitoxin RNAs, and TA RNPs, which can be studied using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy methods.


Key features

• Detailed protocol for the large-scale purification of ToxIN type III toxin–antitoxin complexes from E. coli.

• The optimized protocol results in obtaining milligrams of TA RNP complex, free toxin, and free antitoxin RNA.

• Commercially available plasmid vectors and chemicals are used to complete the protocol in five days after obtaining the required DNA clones.

• The purified TA complex, toxin protein, and antitoxin RNA are used for biophysical experiments such as NMR, ITC, and X-ray crystallography.


Graphical overview


0 Q&A 806 Views Nov 5, 2022

Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification conserved across eukaryotic species. It contributes to a variety of regulatory pathways, including proteasomal degradation, DNA repair, and cellular differentiation. The ubiquitination of substrate proteins typically requires three ubiquitination enzymes: a ubiquitin-activating E1, a ubiquitin-conjugating E2, and an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Cooperation between E2s and E3s is required for substrate ubiquitination, but some ubiquitin-conjugating E2s are also able to catalyze by themselves the formation of free di-ubiquitin, independently or in cooperation with a ubiquitin E2 variant. Here, we describe a method for assessing (i) di-ubiquitin formation by an E1 together with an E2 and an E2 variant, and (ii) the cooperation of an E3 with an E1 and E2 (with or without the E2 variant). Reaction products are assessed using western blotting with one of two antibodies: the first detects all ubiquitin conjugates, while the second specifically recognizes K63-linked ubiquitin. This allows unambiguous identification of ubiquitinated species and assessment of whether K63 linkages are present. We have developed these methods for studying ubiquitination proteins of Leishmania mexicana, specifically the activities of the E2, UBC2, and the ubiquitin E2 variant UEV1, but we anticipate the assays to be applicable to other ubiquitination systems with UBC2/UEV1 orthologues.

0 Q&A 792 Views Oct 5, 2022

Here, we present the first quantitative method for the activity analysis of protealysin-like protease (PLP) inhibitors. This approach is based on a previously developed method for protealysin activity determination by hydrolysis of internally quenched fluorescent peptide substrate 2-aminobenzoyl-L-arginyl-L-seryl-L-valyl-L-isoleucyl-L-(ϵ-2,4-dinitrophenyl)lysine. In this protocol, we significantly reduced enzyme concentration and introduced some minor modifications to decrease variation between replicates. The protocol was validated using emfourin, a novel proteinaceous metalloprotease inhibitor. Data obtained demonstrates that the developed assay method is an affordable approach for characterizing and screening various PLP inhibitors.


Graphical abstract:




0 Q&A 1407 Views Sep 5, 2022

Protein-protein interactions and protein modifications play central roles in all living organisms. Of the more than 200 types of post-translational modifications, ubiquitylation is the most abundant, and it profoundly regulates the functionality of the eukaryotic proteome. Various in vitro and in vivo methodologies to study protein interactions and modifications have been developed, each presenting distinctive benefits and caveats. Here, we present a comprehensive protocol for applying a split-Chloramphenicol Acetyl-Transferase (split-CAT) based system, to study protein-protein interactions and ubiquitylation in E. coli. Functional assembly of bait and prey proteins tethered to the split-CAT fragments result in antibiotic resistance and growth on selective media. We demonstrate assays for protein interactions, protein ubiquitylation, and the system response to small compound modulators. To facilitate data collection, we provide an updated Scanner Acquisition Manager Program for Laboratory Experiments (SAMPLE; https://github.com/PragLab/SAMPLE) that can be employed to monitor the growth of various microorganisms, including E. coli and S. cerevisiae. The advantage posed by this system lies in its sensitivity to a wide range of chloramphenicol concentrations, which allows the detection of a large spectrum of protein-protein interactions, without the need for their purification. The tight linkage between binding or ubiquitylation and growth enables the estimation of apparent relative affinity, and represents the system’s quantitative characteristics.


Graphical abstract:







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