Immunology


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0 Q&A 1468 Views Feb 5, 2022

To identify causative substances for allergies to drugs or foods, the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) is currently widely used as in vitro test, but its accuracy is not satisfactory. We have developed a novel method designated high-sensitivity allergy test (HiSAT) for determining allergy expression by measuring cell kinetics, using the chemotactic cells from non-allergic volunteers against a gradient field of cytokines released from immune cells when allergy develops. HiSAT requires a very small sample of 5 µL or less, and is applicable to three types of tests, depending on the situation in clinical practice: (i) diagnosis of the allergic expression, (ii) identification of the causative drug, and, in principle, (iii) pre-inspection.


Graphic abstract:



Schematic diagram of HiSAT. Serum from patients/subjects is used for rapid diagnosis in HiSAT. To identify the causative drug, the lymphocytes of interest are incubated with the candidate drug solution for 48 h to 72 h and then the culture supernatant is used in HiSAT. Before drug administration, it may possible to avoid the risk of allergies by performing pre-inspection, as well as the determination of the causative drug in HiSAT. A granulocyte-rich cell layer isolated from a non-allergic volunteer is used in HiSAT. Chemotactic cells migrate toward chemotactic factors in the test sample according to the concentration gradient. Cell kinetics (e.g., velocity or distance) are analyzed using sequential images of the test samples, and compared to the PHA-positive control.>


0 Q&A 5402 Views Mar 5, 2019
The early life period represents a time of immunological plasticity whereby the functionally immature immune system is highly susceptible to environmental stimulation. Perennial aeroallergen and respiratory viral infection induced sporadic episodes of lung inflammation during this temporal window represent major risk factors for initiation of allergic asthmatic disease. Murine models are widely used as an investigative tool to examine the pathophysiology of allergic asthma; however, models in current usage typically do not encapsulate the early life period which represents the time of maximal risk for disease inception in humans. To address this issue, this protocol adapted an experimental animal model of disease for sensitization to ovalbumin during the immediate post-weaning period beginning at 21 days of age. By initially sensitizing mice during this early life post-weaning period, researchers can more closely align experimental allergic airway disease models with the human age group most at risk for asthma development.



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