Immunology


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0 Q&A 872 Views Apr 5, 2023

Microinflammation enhances the permeability of specific blood vessel sites through an elevation of local inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. By a two-dimensional immunohistochemistry analysis of tissue sections from mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS), we previously showed that pathogenic immune cells, including CD4+ T cells, specifically accumulate and cause microinflammation at the dorsal vessels of the fifth lumbar cord (L5), resulting in the onset of disease. However, usual pathological analyses by using immunohistochemistry on sections are not effective at identifying the microinflammation sites in organs. Here, we developed a new three-dimensional visualization method of microinflammation using luminescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and the clear, unobstructed brain/body imaging cocktails and computational analysis (CUBIC) tissue-clearing method. Our protocol is based on the detection of leaked AuNCs from the blood vessels due to an enhanced vascular permeability caused by the microinflammation. When we injected ultrasmall coordinated Au13 nanoclusters intravenously (i.v.) to EAE mice, and then subjected the spinal cords to tissue clearing, we detected Au signals leaked from the blood vessels at L5 by light sheet microscopy, which enabled the visualization of complex tissue structures at the whole organ level, consistent with our previous report that microinflammation occurs specifically at this site. Our method will be useful to specify and track the stepwise development of microinflammation in whole organs that is triggered by the recruitment of pathogenic immune cells at specific blood vessels in various inflammatory diseases.

0 Q&A 11559 Views Jul 5, 2017
Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). It is characterized by focal demyelination and inflammatory responses mediated by myelin-specific autoreactive CD4+ T cells. Using a passive transfer model of EAE in mice, we have demonstrated that regional specific neural signals by sensory-sympathetic communications create gateways for immune cells at specific blood vessels of the CNS, a phenomenon known as the gateway reflex (Arima et al., 2012; Tracey, 2012; Arima et al., 2013; Sabharwal et al., 2014; Arima et al., 2015b). Here we describe protocols for passive transfer model of EAE using freshly isolated (MOG)-specific CD4+ T cells or periodically restimulated MOG-specific CD4+ T cell lines, which are suitable for tracking pathogenic CD4+ T cells in vivo, particularly in the CNS (Ogura et al., 2008; Arima et al., 2012 and 2015b).



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