How many crashes had they experienced in that period, what was the mode of transport they used, and whether they were a pedestrian, driver, or passenger at the time of the most serious episode.

The NHS questionnaire asked participants whether they had been involved in a RTA that had resulted in a non-fatal injury in the last 12 months; if so, the analyzed variables were: (i) gender (male or female); (ii) age, categorized as 18–29 years, 30–39 years, and 40–59 years and 60 years and over; (iii) self-declared skin color/race (white; brown; black; or other, encompassing Brazilian Native and Asian); (iv) schooling (higher education or post-graduation, high school, elementary school, and less than elementary school); (v) married/partner (yes or no); (vi) current drinker, defined as alcohol use one or more times in the last month (yes or no); (vii) Binge drinking, defined as consumption of five or more units of alcohol for men or four or more for women on a single occasion in the last 30 days (yes or no); (viii) Drinking and driving (yes or no) in the last 12 months; (ix) Time interval between the accident and the first care measure (<60 or ≥60 minutes); (x) Macro-region of residence (South, Southeast, Central West, North or Northeast); (xi) Area of residence (capital, municipality of the metropolitan region of the capital, or other municipalities of the Federation Unit); (xii) Type of area of residence (urban or rural); (xiii) Condition of victim at the time of the accident (driver or non-driver); (xiv) Modes of transport (motorcycle occupant, car occupant, pedestrian, or other modes of transport, including bus drivers or passengers, truck drivers or passenger, cyclists and occupants of other modes of transport); (xv) Whether the victim stopped performing usual activities (yes or no); (xvi) Whether the victim received care on the site of the RTA (yes or no); (xvii) place where the victim received the first health care measures (on-site, primary health care unit, outpatient emergency unit, public hospital, private hospital, private emergency unit or others); (xviii) Who provided care at the scene of the accident (Emergency Mobile Assistance Service—SAMU), ambulance/fire and rescue service, rescue service of the private sector, or rescue service of private highway concessionaire companies).

The present study evaluated three outcomes: (i) PHC: individuals who presented injuries caused by RTA and who received emergency mobile prehospital care at the site of the accident (for this outcome, the prevalence of RTA victims was estimated according to the following variables: sex, age, race/skin color, schooling, married/partner, macro-region, area of residence, type of area, and modes of transport); (ii) hospitalization: people hospitalized for 24 hours and more (for this outcome, the prevalence of RTA victims was estimated according to the following variables: sex, age, race/skin color, schooling, married/partner, macro-region, current drinker, binge drinking, drinking and driving, area of residence, type of area, modes of transport, and PHC); (iii) presence of sequelae and/or disability resulting from RTA (for this outcome, the prevalence of RTA victims was estimated according to the following variables: sex, age, race/skin color, schooling, married/partner, macro-region, current drinker, binge drinking, drinking and driving, area of residence, type of area, modes of transport, and PHC).

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