Sensory cues in mediating the rotational maneuvers

To study whether and how the patterns of rotational maneuvers were mediated by sensory cues in a feedforward fashion after being triggered, we calculated the Pearson’s linear correlations between the rotational kinematic features and the putative sensory cues that flies may receive at different time instants prior to or during the rotational maneuvers. The rotational kinematic features tested included the peak, average, and integral of the angular velocities (p, q, and r) of the rotational maneuvers. The putative sensory cues tested included the visual (RREV, ωx, and ωy) and mechanosensory cues (Vx, Vy, and Vz). After some preliminary testing and analysis, it was determined that the peak pitch and roll rates best represent the patterns of rotational maneuvers as they also had the strongest correlations with the sensory cues compared with other rotational kinematic features. Therefore, next we calculated the time traces of the correlations between the peak angular rates and the sensory cues at different time instants prior to the moment of peak angular rates. For example, to calculate the correlation between the peak pitch rate and the RREV, the time traces of the RREV from different landing trials were first aligned at the instant of peak pitch rate; then, the time trace of the Pearson’s linear correlations between the peak pitch rate and the RREV at varying time instants prior to the peak pitch rate was calculated.

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