Stimuli of five different categories (faces, houses, tools, nonwords, and false fonts) and vertical and horizontal checkerboards were used. Twenty-four different items were used for each category. The stimuli were presented in mini blocks, which contained seven trials randomly selected from the same category. Each block lasted 10.5 s and was repeated six times. For each trial, a picture was displayed for 200 ms and then followed by a fixation cross for 200 ms. This was followed by a second picture from the same category for 500 ms and a fixation cross for 600 ms. A trial lasted 1.5 s in total. The order of the individual blocks was randomized. There was a 10-s rest period between each block. Participants’ task was to monitor for a black star and to press a key whenever the black star appeared on the screen. For color photographs of faces, we selected pictures from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur database of Indian faces. We selected 24 pictures (12 males and 12 females) from the database. The photos were shown in 400 pixels by 400 pixels. Color photographs of 24 Indian houses and huts were shown in 400 pixels by 400 pixels. Color photographs of 24 household tools were presented in 400 pixels by 400 pixels. Twenty-four nonwords were constructed and presented in white font on a black background in 1024 pixels by 768 pixels. All words are presented on the center of the screen with font size 72. Twenty-four false font strings were constructed and presented in white font on a black background in 1024 pixels by 768 pixels. All false fonts were presented on the center of the screen with font size 72. A flashing checkerboard (increasing in size from 184 pixels by 184 pixels to 218 pixels by 218 pixels) was displayed for 200 ms, followed by a fixation cross for 200 ms. This was followed by another flashing checkerboard presented for 500 ms (increasing in size from 184 pixels by 184 pixels to 293 pixels by 293 pixels). After that, a fixation cross was presented for 600 ms. False fonts were manually generated such that they reflected the typical composition of Devanagari characters in terms of line junctions, curvature, and visual complexity.

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