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Paleolatitude data were obtained using PointTracker v7 rotation files applied to modern latitude and longitude data. Many bins are the same as they are in 10-Ma intervals (e.g., 250 Ma including early Changhsingian, late Changhsingian, early Griesbachian, late Griesbachian, Dienerian, Smithian, Spathian, and early Anisian; 240 Ma including late Anisian, early Ladinian, and late Ladinian; 230 Ma including early and late Carnian; 220 Ma including early and middle Norian; 210 Ma including late Norian and Rhaetian). Fossil collections were assigned into three bins with different paleolatitudes (i.e., tropical regions with paleolatitudes between 23.5°N and 23.5°S; middle-latitude regions with paleolatitudes between 23.5°N and 40°S in both northern and southern hemispheres, respectively; and high-latitude regions with paleolatitudes between 40°N and 90°S in both northern and southern hemispheres, respectively). The division is based on modern sea surface temperature because large temperature gradients occur in these three regions (see fig. S3). For modern oceans, sea surface temperature is generally more than 25°C, between 15° and 25°C, and less than 15°C in low-, middle-, and high-latitude regions, respectively.

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