Also in the Article



Cohen’s Kappa (unadjusted) and the PABAK (adjusted) statistic both reflect the level of agreement between examiners that is above chance agreement. Kappa values range from 0.0 to 1.0, with 0.0 indicating pure chance (50 % raw agreement) and 1.0 indicating perfect agreement (100 % raw agreement). The PABAK statistic is considered a more robust measure of reliability, because it adjusts for the prevalence of positive/negative findings. Kappa values of 0.21 to 0.40 are considered “fair”, values between 0.41 and 0.60 are considered “moderate”, values of 0.61 to 0.80 are considered “substantial”, and values greater than 0.80 are considered “excellent” [17, 18]. Some tests with a lower level of Kappa values still may still be valuable for clinical decision making. Therefore, some have proposed a minimal acceptable cutoff score of Kappa greater than 0.40 for tests used in the clinical setting [19]. A simple way to interpret values is to think of the decimal value as the percentage of agreement above chance. For example, a Kappa value of 0.5 indicates a level of agreement that is 50 % better than chance alone.

Note: The content above has been extracted from a research article, so it may not display correctly.



Also in the Article

Q&A
Please log in to submit your questions online.
Your question will be posted on the Bio-101 website. We will send your questions to the authors of this protocol and Bio-protocol community members who are experienced with this method. you will be informed using the email address associated with your Bio-protocol account.



We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. By using our website, you are agreeing to allow the storage of cookies on your computer.