2.2.1. Work–Family Balance
This protocol is extracted from research article:
Work–Family Balance among Dual-Earner Couples in South Korea: A Latent Profile Analysis
Int J Environ Res Public Health, Jun 6, 2021; DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18116129

To measure work–family balance, we used the work–family strains and gains scales developed by Marchall and Barnett [30]. Specifically, we used the questions that KICCE translated from the original scales for the panel study. Marshall and Barnett [11] argued that family life and parenting should be examined in detail because the quality of experience in the job and parenting roles contributes to work–family strains. Based on this, Marchall and Barnett [30] divided work–family and work–parenting and created four subcategories with a total of 26 questions. Each item was measured on a 5-point Likert scale, ranging from strongly disagree (1 point) to strongly agree (5 points). Higher scores imply a stronger impact for each factor. In this study, we used the mean of the sum of each sub-factor This study Cronbach’s α 0.777. Examples of subfactor questions are as follows:

Factor I. Work–family gains: This sub-factor consists of seven questions and measures the positive aspect of work–family balance. Higher scores indicate a greater perception of gains in work–family balance. An example of a question in this category includes, “taking responsibility at work–family makes me a more balanced person.” This sub-factor Cronbach’s α 0.927.

Factor II. Work–family strains: This sub-factor consists of nine questions and measures the negative aspects of work–family balance. Higher scores indicate a greater perception of strain in work–family balance. An example of a question in this category includes “things to do at work interfere with time spent with family.” This sub-factor Cronbach’s α 0.868.

Factor III. Work–parenting gains: This sub-factor consists of four questions and measures the positive aspects of work–parenting balance. Higher scores indicate a greater perception of gains in work–parenting balance. An example of a question in this category is “my work for has a positive effect on my child.” This sub-factor Cronbach’s α 0.869.

Factor IV. Work–parenting strains: This sub-factor consists of six questions and measures the negative aspects of work–parenting balance. Higher scores indicate a greater perception of strain in the work–parenting balance. An example of a question in this category is “my job seems to put a strain on the child.” This sub-factor Cronbach’s α 0.847.

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